1966 Land Rover Defender 88 Pick Up

$42,500.00

You're already familiar with the usual Land Rover wagons, but when was the last time you saw a pickup like this 1966 Land Rover Series IIA? All the same great utility, reliability, and go-anywhere traction, now in a pickup version with all the cargo space you'll need.

Fully restored truck and ready to be enjoyed. This is a Zero hour vehicle, unusual and fun.

The Series IIA is considered by many the most hardy Series model constructed. It is quite possibly also the type of classic Land Rover that features strongly in the general public's perception of the Land Rover, from its many appearances in popular films and television documentaries set in Africa throughout the 1960s, such as Born Free. In February 1968, just a few months after its manufacturer had been subsumed, under government pressure, into the Leyland Motor Corporation, the Land Rover celebrated its twentieth birthday, with total production to date just short of 600,000, of which more than 70% had been exported.[3] Certainly it was whilst the Series IIA was in production that sales of utility Land Rovers reached their peak, in 1969–70, when sales of over 60,000 Land Rovers a year were recorded.

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Product Description

You’re already familiar with the usual Land Rover wagons, but when was the last time you saw a pickup like this 1966 Land Rover Series IIA? All the same great utility, reliability, and go-anywhere traction, now in a pickup version with all the cargo space you’ll need.

Fully restored truck and ready to be enjoyed. This is a Zero hour vehicle, unusual and fun.

The Series IIA is considered by many the most hardy Series model constructed. It is quite possibly also the type of classic Land Rover that features strongly in the general public’s perception of the Land Rover, from its many appearances in popular films and television documentaries set in Africa throughout the 1960s, such as Born Free. In February 1968, just a few months after its manufacturer had been subsumed, under government pressure, into the Leyland Motor Corporation, the Land Rover celebrated its twentieth birthday, with total production to date just short of 600,000, of which more than 70% had been exported.[3] Certainly it was whilst the Series IIA was in production that sales of utility Land Rovers reached their peak, in 1969–70, when sales of over 60,000 Land Rovers a year were recorded.